Flagstaff Workshop

Workshop Two:

Workshop Two will be hosted by the Department of Anthropology, Applied Indigenous Studies, and the Hopi Iconography Project at Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona.

The workshop will be held on the campus of Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona at the Native American Cultural Center:

Native American Cultural Center – (Bldg #14)
318 W. McCreary Dr.

PO Box: 4085

Flagstaff  AZ  86011 

Day 1:

8:30-9 am: Registration and Coffee

9-10:30 am: Welcome and Introductions by All participants and instructors

10:30-Noon: Digital Native Studies Project Presentations

Workshop 1 Presentations:

Carrie Heitman, Chaco Canyon Archive

Joshua Wells, Digital Index of North American Archaeology

Holly Cusack-McVeigh, Living with Stories

Kelly Hayes-Gilpin, Hopi Iconography Project

Noon- 1 pm: Lunch

1-2 pm: Intellectual Property Issues in Digital Native American and Indigenous Studies

Facilitated by: Holly Cusack-McVeigh and Larry Zimmerman

Required Reading:

Anderson, J. (2005). Indigenous Knowledge, Intellectual Property, Libraries and Archives: Crises of Access, Control and Future Utility. Australian Academic & Research Libraries, 36(2), 83–94. doi:10.1080/00048623.2005.10721250. Download as PDF: Indigenous Knowledge Intellectual Property Libraries and Archives Crises of Access Control and Future Utility

Recommended

Brown, D., & Nicholas, G. (2012). Protecting Indigenous Cultural Property in the Age of Digital Democracy: Institutional and Communal Responses to Canadian First Nations and Maori Heritage Concerns. Journal of Material Culture, 17(3), 307–324. Download as PDF: Protecting Indigenous Cultural Property in the Age of Digital Democracy: Institutional and Communal Responses to Canadian First Nations and Maori Heritage Concerns

2:00-2:15 pm: break

2:15-3:30 pm:  Digital Techniques in Native American and Indigenous Data

Facilitated by: Joshua Wells

Required Readings:

Powell, T., & Aitken, L. (2010). Encoding Culture: Building a Digital Archive Based on Traditional Ojibwe Teachings. In The American Literature Scholar in the Digital Age (Ed. Amy Earhart and Andrew Jewell, pp. 250–274). Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press. View online as HTML: Encoding Culture: Building a Digital Archive Based on Traditional Ojibwe Teachings

Recommended

Honma, Todd. (2005). Trippin’ Over the Color Line: The Invisibility of Race in Library and Information Studies. InterActions: UCLA Journal of Education and Information Studies, 1(2), Article 2. Retrieved from: http://www.escholarship.org/uc/item/4nj0w1mp. Download as PDF: Trippin’ Over the Color Line: The Invisibility of Race in Library and Information Studies

Cushman, E. (2013). Wampum, Sequoyan, and Story: Decolonizing the Digital Archive. College English, 76(2), 116–135. Download as PDF: Wampum, Sequoyan, and Story: Decolonizing the Digital Archive

3:30-4:30 pm

Access Issues in Digital Native American and Indigenous Studies

Facilitated by:

Jennifer Guiliano

Category 1: Scalar
http://scalar.usc.edu/works/performingarchive/index

http://scalar.usc.edu/works/american-indian-film-archive/index

Category 2: Omeka
http://www.americanantiquarian.org/EnglishtoAlgonquian/

https://dp.la/exhibitions/exhibits/show/history-of-survivance

Category 3: Digital Catalog/Aggregator

http://digitalcollections.nypl.org/collections/after-columbus-four-hundred-years-of-native-american-portraiture/

http://carlisleindian.dickinson.edu/

Required Readings:

Senier, S. (2014). Digitizing Indigenous History: Trends and Challenges. Journal of Victorian Culture, 19(3), 396–402. doi:10.1080/13555502.2014.947188. Download as PDF: Digitizing Indigenous History: Trends and Challenges

DAY 2:

8:30-9:00 am: Coffee

9:00-10:30 am: Discovering NAIS data

Facilitated by: Charli Champion-Shaw

Recommended:

Earheart, A. (2012). Can Information Be Unfettered? Race and the New Digital Humanities Canon. In Debates in the Digital Humanities (Ed. Matt Gold). Minneapolis: U of Minnesota P. Retrieved from http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/16. View as HTML: http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/16

Required Reading:

Introduction to linked data and the semantic web, http://www.linkeddatatools.com/semantic-web-basics

10:30-noon: Case Study: Murkutu as Indigenous Content Management

Faciliated by: Michael Wynne

Required Readings:

Christen, K. (2011). Opening Archives: Respectful Repatriation. The American Archivist, 74(Spring/Summer), 185–210. Download as PDF: Opening Archives: Respectful Repatriation

Christen, K. (2005). Gone Digital: Aboriginal Remix and the Cultural Commons. International Journal of Cultural Property, 12(03), 315–345. doi:10.1017/S0940739105050186. Download as PDF: Gone Digital: Aboriginal Remix and the Cultural Commons

Recommended Readings:

Christen, K. (2012). Does Information Really Want to Be Free?: Indigenous Knowledge Systems and the Question of Openness. International Journal of Communication, 6, 2870–2893. Download as PDF: Does Information Really Want to Be Free?: Indigenous Knowledge Systems and the Question of Openness

Joffrion, Elizabeth, and Natalia Fernández, “Collaborations between Tribal and Nontribal Organizations: Suggested Best Practices for Sharing Expertise, Cultural Resources, and Knowledge,” The American Archivist 78:1 (Spring/Summer 2015): 193. Download as PDF: Joffrion_Collaboration

Noon- 1 pm: Lunch

1-1:45 pm: Participant Demonstrations and Birds of A Feather Roundtables

Katie Bunn-Marcuse, Caring for Intangible Heritage at the Burke Museum

Ricky Punzalan, Virtual Repatriation

Robert Leopold, Winter Counts

Desiree Martinez, Mapping Indigenous LA

Craig Dietrich, Tensor

Phil Cash Cash

2:30-5 pm: Museum of Northern Arizona

Transportation will be provided by car for participants.

DAY 3:

8:30-9:00 am: Coffee

9-10:30 am: What Can NAIS bring to the Digital Humanities?

Facilitated by: Carrie Heitman

Required Readings:

McPherson, Tara. (2012). Why Are the Digital Humanities So White? or Thinking the Histories of Race and Computation. Debates in the Digital Humanities, ed. Matthew Gold. Retrieved from: http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/29. View as HTML: http://dhdebates.gc.cuny.edu/debates/text/29.

Recommended Readings:

Philip, Kavita, Lilly Irani, and Paul Dourish. (2010). Post-Colonial Computing: A Tactical Survey. Science Technology Human Values 37(1), 3-29. Retrieved from: 10.1177/0162243910389594. View as PDF: Post-Colonial Computing: A Tactical Survey

10:30-10:45 am: Break

10:45- Noon: Working Groups

Noon- 1 pm: Lunch

1-2:30 pm: Reporting Out